Friday, April 1, 2011

Amazing Visualization of the Most Recent 866 Earthquakes in Japan since March 11th.


Check this out – it is AMAZING!  It depicts the series of earthquakes that have occurred off the coast of Japan since March 11, 2011.  Make sure you set the “sticky dots” to display, and show “Magnitudes: All” for the full effect.  The animation shows the time series of 866 quakes (so far!), at depths from less than 2.5 km to over 50 km.  You can set the animation to go for the whole period since March 11th, for the past 7 days, or just for today.  Today alone there were 14 quakes, as of 11:00 am EDT. 


Some other websites related to the Earthquakes in Japan (these sent by Kristen Grady): Radiation Map criticism): http://www.maproomblog.com/2011/03/an_irresponsible_radiation_map.php

You may have seen this one already, because I think it’s made the rounds, but it is pretty amazing! (drag the new image over the old one)

And this from Jenn Brisbane:
“I ran across this link this morning.  Amazing how useful community mapping can be in times of crisis.  Here is a google map that was created for people to list shelters in and around the Tokyo area.  Some of the shelters have a lot of detail such as # of beds, toilets, whether there is a nursery, and whether food is being provided.  I'm not sure if the people staying at these shelters are Tokyo residents or if they have transferred people from the tsunami-stricken areas to Tokyo.  Hopefully there are similar maps for shelters closer to the Sendai area.”



3 comments:

  1. Wow. That Japan earthquake animation was awesome! Does anyone know why they used the depth of the earthquake as the primary visualization? I was expecting it to be the magnitude...

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  2. Yes, I think the color of the dot and the circle correspond to the depth of the quake, and the size of the circle represents the magnitude. If you look at the March 11th quakes, that becomes really obvious, but it's not so apparent when you look at the more recent quakes, since they are all, for the most part, of a magnitude under 5.0.

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  3. That's amazing!

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